September 26, 2014

Rick Owens Women’s Spring Summer 2015 Faun


Interview via Another

Do you have a mentor or inspirational figure that has guided or influenced you?

Legion.

Where do you feel most at home?

At the beach — any beach.

Where are you right now?

My office in Paris prepping my spring show.

What is your proudest achievement in work?

Survival.

What is your proudest achievement in life?

Self-invention.

What do you most dislike about contemporary culture?

Casual hostility.

What do you most like about the age we live in?

The internet.

At what points do life and work intersect?

Everybody has a different way, but for me they are pretty much the same. If I hadn’t found something to do, I would have been a crack whore.

What’s the best advice you’ve been given?

Get over yourself.

What is the biggest risk you’ve ever taken?

Trusting myself.

Recommend a book or poem that has changed your perspective on life?

Reading The Death of Tintagiles by Maeterlinck when I was a child might have inspired a melancholy minimalism that I have used.

What is your earliest childhood memory?

A neighbour showing me a handmade box covered in rhinestones. I must have been about three.

What’s the most important relationship in your life?

My better half, Hun.

What’s the most romantic action you’ve taken?

Getting married.

What’s the most spiritual action you’ve taken?

Going to the gym.

If you could wish for one change in the world what would it be?

I don’t profess to know better — it is all an evolutionary miracle that seems to balance out despite collapse and glory.

September 23, 2014
Rick Owens: Secure in His Own World
Video on NyTimes
Q. How long have you been in this building?

A. Twelve years now. When we first moved in, it had drop acoustical tile ceilings with fluorescent lights and carpeting and wallpaper, and we ripped it all out. We did it right before a show period, so we hadn’t had time to seal anything, like the concrete or the walls or anything, so the bottom floors were filthy and everybody, all of the buyers, knew who had been to the Rick Owens showroom in Paris because they would be walking in the streets covered head to foot in dust. Nobody really complained. I think they were delighted a little bit because it was such an extreme experience and they probably felt like they had an adventure. As well as some asbestos poisoning or something.

Q. Was it weird to move from Hollywood Boulevard, where you started your career, to the Seventh Arrondissement in Paris? You are right behind the Assemblée Nationale.

When we first moved to Paris, we lived in the Marais, and there’s just too many parties with all of those kids running around. Here, it’s just embassies and old families. Everybody in this building has some kind of aristocratic name, and I am this nouveau riche American that’s ruining the neighborhood. One of my favorite things is going to sleep at night, and we can hear the footsteps on the gravel of the guards patrolling the garden. It’s just the most delicious sense of security.

Q. Why did you decide to come to Paris?

I was manufacturing in Italy, and going back and forth between Italy and Los Angeles just didn’t make sense, and since I’d started showing in Paris, it made sense to move everything here. It doesn’t really make a difference. There were times that I kind of forget I am not still in Los Angeles, because I kind of create the same triangle here: the couple of restaurants I eat at, my house and office, and the gym. It’s just that now I walk through the Jardin des Tuileries to get to the gym, which is very different than Hollywood Boulevard.

Q. Has the office changed a lot since you’ve been here?

This room just recently changed. It used to be very destroyed, and the ceiling was kind of falling apart. It was a little bombed-out looking. It’s only very recently that I plastered it all up and made it all extra shiny white. As I get older, I need more organization. It’s not because of the pace of fashion or anything, because to tell you the truth, I’m so addicted I don’t think I would want it any slower. I’m fine with it being fast. I’m fine with the deadlines and stuff. It gives me a silly little sense of purpose.

Q. Did you make the chair and the desk?

Yeah. When we first moved in here, we needed a lot of stuff, and that would have been a fortune. So I just faked it with what we had in hand. The chair is just a box with pillows. I like reducing everything that I do to a rock and a fire and a fur in a cave. So I’m thinking, What are the essentials? We need a couple of benches, we need a bed. What else? Light switches. Light switches should be great because you have to touch them every day.

Q. So you keep most of the materials on your desk, or do you sketch?

I don’t sketch. I mainly do it with draping. What I do every season is order toiles of past styles that we’ve done. Then I manipulate them here and take photos and sketch over them, or I do a line, or paste them up together, and then they send me another toile and I manipulate that, and that’s how we work here. Right now I’m trying to figure out how to make tulle look like concrete. Fashion is just a fresh combination of elements that we all connect with.

Q. There’s very little other than tulle on your desk.

There are some crystals. I just like how they seem kind of spiritual even though I’m not at all. Kind of spiritual and prehistoric. I like to think about the grandest scale possible. When I see things that are a little too traditional or things that I can define too easily, it makes me react and want to do something that is more a summary of our experiences instead of just one facet.

Q. Do you like working where you live?

I do. I have this incredible advantage of being independent and this being kind of my personal indulgence. I really do stay in my own world. There have been times when we were growing where I did feel a sense of responsibility, and I started to think about what do people want, what are people responding to, what should I do next? And I learned that that was a mistake. I learned that listening didn’t work for me. I couldn’t interpret well enough. I hadn’t developed the social skills to filter what was valuable and what was distraction. So finally I learned that I really had to be completely selfish and just think about what amused me, what I enjoy. Because people seem to respond to the things that I connect to the most.

Rick Owens: Secure in His Own World

Video on NyTimes

Q. How long have you been in this building?

A. Twelve years now. When we first moved in, it had drop acoustical tile ceilings with fluorescent lights and carpeting and wallpaper, and we ripped it all out. We did it right before a show period, so we hadn’t had time to seal anything, like the concrete or the walls or anything, so the bottom floors were filthy and everybody, all of the buyers, knew who had been to the Rick Owens showroom in Paris because they would be walking in the streets covered head to foot in dust. Nobody really complained. I think they were delighted a little bit because it was such an extreme experience and they probably felt like they had an adventure. As well as some asbestos poisoning or something.

Q. Was it weird to move from Hollywood Boulevard, where you started your career, to the Seventh Arrondissement in Paris? You are right behind the Assemblée Nationale.

When we first moved to Paris, we lived in the Marais, and there’s just too many parties with all of those kids running around. Here, it’s just embassies and old families. Everybody in this building has some kind of aristocratic name, and I am this nouveau riche American that’s ruining the neighborhood. One of my favorite things is going to sleep at night, and we can hear the footsteps on the gravel of the guards patrolling the garden. It’s just the most delicious sense of security.

Q. Why did you decide to come to Paris?

I was manufacturing in Italy, and going back and forth between Italy and Los Angeles just didn’t make sense, and since I’d started showing in Paris, it made sense to move everything here. It doesn’t really make a difference. There were times that I kind of forget I am not still in Los Angeles, because I kind of create the same triangle here: the couple of restaurants I eat at, my house and office, and the gym. It’s just that now I walk through the Jardin des Tuileries to get to the gym, which is very different than Hollywood Boulevard.

Q. Has the office changed a lot since you’ve been here?

This room just recently changed. It used to be very destroyed, and the ceiling was kind of falling apart. It was a little bombed-out looking. It’s only very recently that I plastered it all up and made it all extra shiny white. As I get older, I need more organization. It’s not because of the pace of fashion or anything, because to tell you the truth, I’m so addicted I don’t think I would want it any slower. I’m fine with it being fast. I’m fine with the deadlines and stuff. It gives me a silly little sense of purpose.

Q. Did you make the chair and the desk?

Yeah. When we first moved in here, we needed a lot of stuff, and that would have been a fortune. So I just faked it with what we had in hand. The chair is just a box with pillows. I like reducing everything that I do to a rock and a fire and a fur in a cave. So I’m thinking, What are the essentials? We need a couple of benches, we need a bed. What else? Light switches. Light switches should be great because you have to touch them every day.

Q. So you keep most of the materials on your desk, or do you sketch?

I don’t sketch. I mainly do it with draping. What I do every season is order toiles of past styles that we’ve done. Then I manipulate them here and take photos and sketch over them, or I do a line, or paste them up together, and then they send me another toile and I manipulate that, and that’s how we work here. Right now I’m trying to figure out how to make tulle look like concrete. Fashion is just a fresh combination of elements that we all connect with.

Q. There’s very little other than tulle on your desk.

There are some crystals. I just like how they seem kind of spiritual even though I’m not at all. Kind of spiritual and prehistoric. I like to think about the grandest scale possible. When I see things that are a little too traditional or things that I can define too easily, it makes me react and want to do something that is more a summary of our experiences instead of just one facet.

Q. Do you like working where you live?

I do. I have this incredible advantage of being independent and this being kind of my personal indulgence. I really do stay in my own world. There have been times when we were growing where I did feel a sense of responsibility, and I started to think about what do people want, what are people responding to, what should I do next? And I learned that that was a mistake. I learned that listening didn’t work for me. I couldn’t interpret well enough. I hadn’t developed the social skills to filter what was valuable and what was distraction. So finally I learned that I really had to be completely selfish and just think about what amused me, what I enjoy. Because people seem to respond to the things that I connect to the most.

September 18, 2014

The World of Rick Owens’ Sculpture Selfridges London

September 3, 2014

The 25 foot polystyrene sculpture of Owens’s naked torso was created from a maquette designed by the British sculptor Doug Jennings, and features a flaming torch that will burn for 12 hours a day, for a total of 552 hours. Frankly, it looks brilliant.

 

The statue is the pièce de résistance of “The World of Rick Owens”, a new collaboration between Rick Owens and Selfridges that marks twenty years since the Californian designer launched his eponymous label. He’s also curated a series of window designs for the department store; three are influenced by the Richard Strauss opera Salome. 

 

Owens has also designed an exclusive 20-piece collection for the collab, with each item labelled with Selfridges’ signature yellow and the motif of his torso. So if you want to see Rick Owens immortalised in fibreglass and pick up a limited edition piece, head down to Selfridges – just look out for the giant statue. 

August 18, 2014
Rick Owens for Selfridges ‘Masters of Fashion’ 

Rick Owens for Selfridges ‘Masters of Fashion’ 

July 4, 2014

Rick Owens Spring Summer 2015 Embroidery 

July 3, 2014

Rick Owens Spring Summer 2015 Interview

June 26, 2014

Rick Owens Men’s Spring Summer 2015

Leave it to Rick to always surprise… 
This collection was nothing like I was expecting and honestly by this point I feel like I should expect that from Rick. As a proponent for drop crotch pants even I’m intrigued by what appears to be some kind of tied sarong shorts but it’s hard to tell with the way this show is style. Many garments are worn in such unnatural ways tied and draped over the bodies of the models.

The whole show has a very obvious tribal feel to it with the styling and of course the body paint. Who could forget the body paint… a very bold choice. 

An interesting addition to the collection was the embroidered prints. These were based on a series of drawings Rick Owens team member Benoit had drawn for Rick and Michelle in previous years.

As well in an interview regarding the collection Rick Owens attributed some of the inspiration to ‘the ballet ‘Afternoon of a Faun’ 

"I was thinking about the ballet Afternoon of a Faun, choreographed by Nijinsky. It basically all culminates with this faun masturbating on a nymph’s scarf, so everybody in the audience, with all their jewels, are just waiting for this guy to hump the scarf. I love that!" – Rick Owens.

April 1, 2014

Rick Owens’ Palais Royal 2010

Photographer: 
Adrian Wilson

March 13, 2014

Rick Owen’s Women FW14

'These people are connected in such a deep way to the clothes and I said why didn’t I think of this before? This makes so much sense, it’s so logical.'

via Antonioli