April 16, 2012
Symposium - The Samurai & The Warrior | Lumen et Umbra vs. Boris Bidjan Saberi
The University of Bologna’s pioneering approach to fashion led Fabriano Fabbri, President of the Second Level Fashion Degree, to organize a symposioum, helded on the 2nd of April at the Rimini based ZoneModa space. The event hosted a debate between two radical and unconventional designers: Boris Bidjan Saberi and Issei Fujita from Lumen et Umbra. Allegorically viewed as the fighters of the fashion’s common senses, Boris and Issei explained their very own creative languages that separate their works from the oppressive traditional dynamics of designing, production and sale. The connection with the contemporary reality doesn’t disappear, but is explored through unusual ways, which often are a direct expression of the designer’s individual feelings, just his curious desire of experimentation without any immediate purpose, and thought secondly for the public. There’s the desire to beat the time flow through very slow artisianal techniques, which survive at the main stream’s seasonal politics. Issei, locked in his silence, let digital videos talk about his work, deliberately non-figurative, which revealed the Lumen et Umbra’s attempt to go into the the textures of fabrics, in order to extract their inner energy an understand their secret algorithm. So Fujita approach to clothes could be seen as an endogenous process of deconstruction that tear apart and reassemble the garments, like they were digital images, made up of millions of decomposable pixels. Boris, instead, told us how his vocation for design has always been drived by an instinctive desire of play with shapes and materials, inspired by his ideological and cultural mix. Post-apocalyptic scenes of a broken reality are reflected into the heavily altered garments, which portrait Saberi’s harsh worldview. And if Lumen et Umbra’s treatments evoke a sort of meditative and ancestral power through the ancient art of craftsmanship processes, Boris’ aesthetic features a strong technologic and artificial appeal that elicit immediately an emotional reaction from the viewer. They both reach the final result through an endless dialogue between their own actions and the object, which responds in unexpected ways, innervated by a new energy that can never be fully controllable. So the concept of “fashion”, broadly speaking, has no meaning applied to their creations, and is replaced by a series of naked garments: living and usable metaphors of intimate thoughts. 

Symposium - The Samurai & The Warrior | Lumen et Umbra vs. Boris Bidjan Saberi

The University of Bologna’s pioneering approach to fashion led Fabriano Fabbri, President of the Second Level Fashion Degree, to organize a symposioum, helded on the 2nd of April at the Rimini based ZoneModa space. The event hosted a debate between two radical and unconventional designers: Boris Bidjan Saberi and Issei Fujita from Lumen et Umbra. Allegorically viewed as the fighters of the fashion’s common senses, Boris and Issei explained their very own creative languages that separate their works from the oppressive traditional dynamics of designing, production and sale. The connection with the contemporary reality doesn’t disappear, but is explored through unusual ways, which often are a direct expression of the designer’s individual feelings, just his curious desire of experimentation without any immediate purpose, and thought secondly for the public. There’s the desire to beat the time flow through very slow artisianal techniques, which survive at the main stream’s seasonal politics. Issei, locked in his silence, let digital videos talk about his work, deliberately non-figurative, which revealed the Lumen et Umbra’s attempt to go into the the textures of fabrics, in order to extract their inner energy an understand their secret algorithm. So Fujita approach to clothes could be seen as an endogenous process of deconstruction that tear apart and reassemble the garments, like they were digital images, made up of millions of decomposable pixels. Boris, instead, told us how his vocation for design has always been drived by an instinctive desire of play with shapes and materials, inspired by his ideological and cultural mix. Post-apocalyptic scenes of a broken reality are reflected into the heavily altered garments, which portrait Saberi’s harsh worldview. And if Lumen et Umbra’s treatments evoke a sort of meditative and ancestral power through the ancient art of craftsmanship processes, Boris’ aesthetic features a strong technologic and artificial appeal that elicit immediately an emotional reaction from the viewer. They both reach the final result through an endless dialogue between their own actions and the object, which responds in unexpected ways, innervated by a new energy that can never be fully controllable. So the concept of “fashion”, broadly speaking, has no meaning applied to their creations, and is replaced by a series of naked garments: living and usable metaphors of intimate thoughts.